Editor Interview: Autumn Sky Poetry Daily

Q: Describe what you publish in 25 characters or less.

A: Poetry-10 poems/10 poets

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: What other current publications (or publishers) do you admire most?

A: I enjoy reading Rattle, Think Journal, Leveler, Linebreak, Poetspeak, Diode, OCHO, Poets & Artists, 3 Quarks Daily, Touch: The Journal of Healing, and many more.

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: If you publish writing, who are your favorite writers? If you publish art, who are your favorite artists?

A: Some of my favorite poets are: Jack Gilbert, Carolyn Forche, Robert Frost, Linda Pastan, Susan Rich, William Carlos Williams, Donald Hall, Dorianne Laux, Elizabeth Bishop, and so many others.

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: What sets your publication apart from others that publish similar material?

A: I publish only ten poets per issue, one poem per poet, all of them excellent and just one click away from the cover page.

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: What is the best advice you can give people who are considering submitting work to your publication?

A: Please, please, please read my submission guidelines. Also, resist adding blinking fonts, crazy colors, center justification, etc. to your poems. They're really tough on the eyes when I've been reading all day.

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: Describe the ideal submission.

A: Very brief cover letter (or none at all), brief bio, and four poems in the body of an email.

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: What do submitters most often get wrong about your submissions process?

A: Many submitters send more than four poems and submit much more often than every six months. Additionally, I tend to ignore long, involved explanations of poems. If the work can't stand on its own, don't send it.

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: How much do you want to know about the person submitting to you?

A: I don't mind a short bio or a small personal note, but I rarely read long cover letters. It takes time away from reading the work. Lists of previous publications don't matter at all to me. I don't read the bio until after I read the poems.

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: If you publish writing, how much of a piece do you read before making the decision to reject it?

A: I read at least four to eight lines of every poem. If my eyes wander, I know the it's not right for my publication. That may not seem like I give each poem enough time, but I usually scan the rest and/or read the last part of a poem before giving up on it. Some poems I read five or even ten times until I'm certain I understand the work.

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: What additional evaluations, if any, does a piece go through before it is accepted?

A: I have a very simple process. I read all the submissions for an issue at one time. This usually takes three days to a week. The poems I like go into a "maybe" pile, the others are rejected. The "maybe" pile I read through several times, picking poems that seem to work well with each other until I have ten. Those I accept. The others I reject or ask to keep for a future issue. That's it.

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: What is a day in the life of an editor like for you?

A: I don't read submissions all the time: I save them and then hit the pile all at once during the first week or so of a release month. This means that I read poems all day long for three to five days. Luckily, I'm a working writer, so I can usually devote all my attention to my journal when I'm reading submissions. The poems I like I keep aside, the ones I don't get rejected immediately. I don't print anything out so I'm glued to my computer for those few days.

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: How important do you feel it is for publishers to embrace modern technologies?

A: I think it's extremely important. Marketing, social networking, and publishing online can increase readership. My journal has just begun releasing issues on the iPad on a uniquely designed app just for Autumn Sky Poetry. More readers are logging onto the internet every day during lunch or on the weekends, just to see what's happening in the world. I say: poetry is happening in the world and now it's easier than ever to find it.

Christine Klocek-Lim, editor-in-chief on 15 July 2010 Read other answers to this question