Editor Interview: The Commonline Journal BETA

Q: Describe what you publish in 25 characters or less.

A: The common spectrum.

Joseph Osel, Publisher on 10 June 2012 Read other answers to this question

Q: What other current publications (or publishers) do you admire most?

A: I find the small DIY publications with a strong community base the most admirable. With that said, most of my favorite publications are in some stage of defunction.

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Q: Who are your favorite writers?

A: We publish all kinds of writing, but The Commonline Journal acquired its reputation in the electronic zeitgeist by publishing Dirty Realism in both genres so our favorite writers tend to have associations and influences there.

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Q: What sets your publication apart from others that publish similar material?

A: Our explicit goal is to promote class solidarity and spatial agitation.

Joseph Osel, Publisher on 10 June 2012 Read other answers to this question

Q: What is the best advice you can give people who are considering submitting work to your publication?

A: Be critical of yourself and edit your work before sending it off. Ask yourself if The Commonline Journal is the right market for your work, lead with your best piece and skip the lengthy introductions. Embrace simplicity. Fight back.

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Q: Describe the ideal submission.

A: The ideal submission is well crafted and written by, for and about the commons. That means that it employs accessible and evocative language and reflects the cultural sphere of experience shared by and between communities, that is, those held in common or by the commoner.

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Q: What do submitters most often get wrong about your submissions process?

A: Many writers who seek to appeal to our Dirty Realist roots often over do the dirty and under do the realism.

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Q: How much do you want to know about the person submitting to you?

A: We don’t need to know anything beyond what the submission itself reveals.

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Q: How much of a piece do you read before making the decision to reject it?

A: A large majority, usually.

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Q: What additional evaluations, if any, does a piece go through before it is accepted?

A: Once a piece of writing is accepted by the Editor they consider placement within the issue in which it is scheduled to appear, as well as any potential pairings with visual art, etc…

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Q: How important do you feel it is for publishers to embrace modern technologies?

A: It’s obviously important for webzines and DIY operations to embrace modern technologies because the medium itself demands that.

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