Editor Interview: Eternal Haunted Summer BETA

Q: Describe what you publish in 25 characters or less.

A: Pagan-themed literature

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 27 June 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: What other current publications (or publishers) do you admire most?

A: (Books) Artesia, The Balance of the Two Lands: Writings in Greco-Egyptian Polytheism, Faith and Magick in the Armed Forces: A Handbook for Pagans in the Military, Introduction to Pagan Studies, Kharis: Hellenic Polytheism Explored, Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner, Ogam: Weaving Word Wisdom, The Phillupic Hymns, Whisper of Stone: Natib Qadish, A World Full of Gods: An Inquiry into Polytheism; (Blogs/Sites) Henadology, Pagan+Politics, No Unsacred Place, The Wild Hunt; (Periodicals) Goblin Fruit, Hex, Minerva, Mythic Delirium, witches&pagans, Yes!; (Publishers) Archaia, Asphodel Press, Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Dark Horse, Image, New Page, O Books, Vertigo, Villard

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 21 June 2011 Read other answers to this question

Q: Who are your favorite writers?

A: Poets: Callimachus, Janine Canan, Andrew Gyll, Seamus Heaney, Hesiod, Galina Krasskova, P Sufenas Virius Lupus, Lykeia, Robert McDowell, Ovid, Robert Pinsky, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Jane Yolen; Prose Authors: Lloyd Alexander, Christine de Pizan, Diane Duane, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kazu Kibuishi, Robin McKinley, Alan Moore, CL Moore, Henry David Thoreau, Jane Yolen

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 27 June 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: What sets your publication apart from others that publish similar material?

A: To my knowledge, there are *no* other publications like Eternal Haunted Summer. There are print and online publications which focus on Pagan-themed nonfiction, such as witches&pagans and The Wild Hunt. And there are print and online publications which focus on a particular tradition within the Pagan umbrella, such as Hex (Heathen-oriented) and SageWoman (Goddess Spirituality). But EHS is the *only* ezine that accepts poetry, short fiction, essays, reviews and interviews from *any* Pagan tradition.

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 21 June 2011 Read other answers to this question

Q: What is the best advice you can give people who are considering submitting work to your publication?

A: Spellcheck, spellcheck, spellcheck, spellcheck. Then hand it over to a beta-reader, and take their suggestions seriously; no written work is perfect on the first try. Then spellcheck again, this time visually; the computer doesn't know the difference between "lightning" and "lightening." Finally, make sure that your work meets the submissions criteria; if you send me something that I can't publish, I'll just be irked.

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 27 June 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: Describe the ideal submission.

A: My ideal submission has one particular quality: sincerity. I am looking for ecstatic poems about Thor. Tales of awe-inspiring encounters with Athena. Heart-felt haikus about Asherah. Urban fantasy about Isis. The genre and form don't matter; the tone of the piece *does.*

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 27 June 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: What do submitters most often get wrong about your submissions process?

A: They send submissions in the form of .doc or .docx attachments. Those are difficult for me to open. I much prefer .rtf or .txt attachments, or submissions in the body of the email.

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 27 June 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: How much do you want to know about the person submitting to you?

A: That is entirely up to the submittee. Nom de plumes are fine. I also like to include brief author biographies, though, so authors can link back to their blogs, sites, et cetera, or list their previous publications.

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 27 June 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: How much of a piece do you read before making the decision to reject it?

A: I read the entire piece. Sometimes I like the submission, but will send it back with editing notes, and only publish it after improvements have been made.

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 27 June 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: What additional evaluations, if any, does a piece go through before it is accepted?

A: Standard proofing to correct any typographical or grammatical errors. If there are more serious problems -- such as dangling plot threads -- I will send it back to the author with notes on what needs fixing. Once the corrections are made (or the author makes a really good argument for leaving it as is), I'll accept the submission.

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 27 June 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: What is a day in the life of an editor like for you?

A: My day: working my Real Job (tm); coming home to comb through email submissions; sending out acceptance or rejection emails; prepping the new issue; breaking for chocolate; starting all over again.

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 27 June 2010 Read other answers to this question

Q: How important do you feel it is for publishers to embrace modern technologies?

A: Very. Where would we be now if someone had burned Guttenberg's press?

Rebecca Buchanan, Editor-in-Chief on 27 June 2010 Read other answers to this question