Editor Interview: Bosley Gravel's Cavalcade of Terror

Q: Describe what you publish in 25 characters or less.

A: Quirky & dark pulp horror

Bosley Gravel, editor-in-chief on 23 April 2011 Read other answers to this question

Q: What other current publications (or publishers) do you admire most?

A: Every Day Fiction, Microhorror, Reflections Edge, Wanderings Magazine, The Fabulist, Well Told Tales

Bosley Gravel, editor-in-chief on 23 April 2011 Read other answers to this question

Q: If you publish writing, who are your favorite writers? If you publish art, who are your favorite artists?

A: Clive Barker, Stephen King's (short stories), William S. Burroughs, The Brothers Grim, Troma Entertainment, circa 1990s horror anthology television

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Q: What sets your publication apart from others that publish similar material?

A: The Cavalcade of Terror strives to feature prolific authors (established and developing) who seek a venue for exceptional reprints, experimental prose, and other odds and ends that might otherwise stay in the virtual trunk. While CoT is now a paying market we strive to remain a for-the-love-of venue where authors need not worry about all the rigidness of the pro-marketplace.

Bosley Gravel, editor-in-chief on 23 April 2011 Read other answers to this question

Q: What is the best advice you can give people who are considering submitting work to your publication?

A: Send a completed piece of prose. Experimental is fine, but it needs to resonant and engage the reader. We want to hear your voice jumping off the page, we want you to approach a story from a perspective that is uniquely yours. A bit of blood on the page will seal the deal.

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Q: Describe the ideal submission.

A: The ideal CoTs submission has a spectacular and memorable voice; it should be short, sweet and trimmed to the bone.

Bosley Gravel, editor-in-chief on 23 April 2011 Read other answers to this question

Q: What do submitters most often get wrong about your submissions process?

A: Stories are usually rejected due to length, or clunky prose. Our guidelines are not particular strict, but the closer an author gets to to requested formating the more likely we are to accept.

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Q: How much do you want to know about the person submitting to you?

A: We prefer a bio and a link along with the submission. We do check out an author's web presence to make sure the author is the type of person we'd like to deal with. The bio and the link are reused upon acceptance for promotional purposes. A cover letter or the sake of a cover letter is just silly. If you've got something to interesting to say, we're all ears, we do hope you've saved the good stuff for the fiction though.

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Q: If you publish writing, how much of a piece do you read before making the decision to reject it?

A: I can usually tell in the first paragraph if the author's style is something I like. If the prose doesn't work for me, but the story is engaging it may still get accepted if the 'doesn't work' is a matter of style or taste. Occasionally I will ask for a rewrite if a story shows promise, but is lacking in some respect -- soft rejections like this get a full read.

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Q: What is a day in the life of an editor like for you?

A: Nothing too fancy happens behind the scenes, we try to keep things going at a leisurely pace. We want the Cavalcade of Terror to be a vacation from high pressure writing situations. We want the process to be fluid and pleasant for the authors, the editors, and the readers.

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Q: How important do you feel it is for publishers to embrace modern technologies?

A: There hasn't been this much change in publishing since Gutenberg and his little press thing. We heartily embrace new technology, and in fact entirely rely on it. We hope that you do too.

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