Editor Interview: Indiana Voice Journal

Q: Describe what you publish in 25 characters or less.

A: Visions, Dreams, Hope.

Q: What other current publications (or publishers) do you admire most?

A: Thema Literary Journal, Literary Orphans, Canary, Ploughshares, Glimmer Train

Q: If you publish writing, who are your favorite writers? If you publish art, who are your favorite artists?

A: Mary Hood, Annie Dillard, Eudora Welty, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ray Bradbury, William Faulkner, Robert James Waller

Q: What sets your publication apart from others that publish similar material?

A: I've been told it is the visual beauty of the journal. We use a lot of photographs and artwork, well placed, to illustrate many of the stories and poems. We also use author bio pictures with every feature if the author is receptive to that. It's an option. But I think the huge amount of quality content we publish is the main thing that sets us apart. We are a monthly publishing at least18- 20 featured authors/artists/poets in each issue. Twelve times a year. In addition to that, we publish special poetry or themed issues every so often. So it really is an amazing amount of material. Another thing, we actually do publish new writers with little or no credits, right alongside experienced writer's whose bio's stretch a mile long.

Q: What is the best advice you can give people who are considering submitting work to your publication?

A: Read the journal. Subscribe. Study the guidelines. Check in on the Editorial News page once in a while. Indiana Voice Journal isn't written in stone. It flows. It changes, it moves fast. You need to read to keep up, so I highly recommend subscribing or checking in often.

Q: Describe the ideal submission.

A: The ideal submission is an original, unpublished piece within the word limits that doesn't strain or strive to be heard. One that contains all the elements of a layered story in an unexpected voice. One that is still whispering and singing after the words have come to their end.

Q: What do submitters most often get wrong about your submissions process?

A: The belief that I can respond to their submissions immediately. I don't have an editorial staff at this time, and I receive anywhere between 3-20 submissions a day. It's a bit overwhelming.

Q: How much do you want to know about the person submitting to you?

A: If the piece is good, I'll use it. I do require contact information, copyright information, and category identification such as Flash, Fiction, Nonfiction, etc... Previous publication credits and cover letters are optional.

Q: If you publish writing, how much of a piece do you read before making the decision to reject it?

A: I wish I could say I read every piece through to the end. I don't. If I can get through the first or second paragraph without starting over, the piece has a chance. It's held my attention. I can usually tell within the first or second paragraph if a story is right for us.

Q: What additional evaluations, if any, does a piece go through before it is accepted?

A: Spelling and grammar checks. I'm willing to correct a few mistakes, but I don't have time to do complete makeovers. Please proofread before sending in your submissions.