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Editor Interviews

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Read all the editors' answers to Duotrope's interview question: How important do you feel it is for publishers to embrace modern technologies? Learn more.

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Here is a small sampling from our recent Editor Interviews. We have interviewed over 2,200 editors.

Q: How important do you feel it is for publishers to embrace modern technologies?

A: It's been years since we've received any submissions via paper mail, and I think that's a good thing -- email is just so much faster and more convenient, not to mention saving trees and fuel. And of course many of our readers now read our books in ebook format. But Hard Case Crime is an intentionally old-fashioned line of books, created to revive a particular style -- the mid-century "pulp" paperback -- and so I feel our paper editions, with their glorious painted covers, are the "real" product in some way, and I would prefer for all our readers to get to experience our books in that way. So while we do embrace modern ways of getting things done, we also like the best artifacts of the past.

A: It's really important for publishers to embrace modern technologies to make the submission process more economically friendly, paperless, and allow submissions of different forms (for example, visual poetry).

A: A Sci Fi publication that doesn't embrace the future is a bit of a silly thing isn't it?
That being said do not send us anything that has been so much as whispered to by "A.I". It's insulting to the process.

A: I think it's important not to become a dinosaur and to stay current. The recent battle with AI-generated work is a good example of a problem.

Richard Thomas, Editor-in-Chief / Editor of Gamut Magazine, 01 February 2024

A: We're open - we think its best for publishers to do what they most enjoy, and do best.

A: Since we are an on-line magazine, knowing how to use a computer is kinda important.

Gary A. Markette, Senior editor of Anotherealm, 28 January 2024

A: We're open to it all... We have a digital and physical media presence.

Chelsea Rector, Editor-in-chief of Linked Verse, 14 January 2024

A: I think people only know about us because of Twitter, and it's more accessible if submissions are electronic for us. Generative texts and images are not for us, seems suspicious and bad.

A: For us it is mandatory. The field of scientific journals requires modern technologies, in special to gather quotations.

A: We both love the traditional (e.g. letterpress printing) and embrace the modern. I have owned traditional printing presses (and still have a Chandler & Price in my garage). But the modern technologies afford a wider audience and are much less expensive to participate in. Traditional certainly still has a role, but the modern makes life easier.

A: With Cowboy literature, we obviously love the traditional. But we love and embrace the modern as well.
I have owned traditional printing presses (and still have a Chandler & Price in my garage). But the modern technologies afford a wider audience and are much less expensive to participate in. Traditional certainly still has a role, but the modern makes life easier.

A: I think this question for me has more to do with what's feasible financially for a press or journal, alongside accessibility. Annulet is online because it is cheap, and because I care about accessibility—I want anyone, anywhere, who has access to the internet to be able to read it, with no paywalls or institutional barriers. And in consequence, as you're not going to discover it in a bookstore, presence on social media is usually helpful for expanding our network of potential submitters. But presence doesn't mean mindlessly churning out content—one important factor is that I never want to waste anyone's time, whether it's a post or a piece Annulet's chosen to publish. Different kinds of presses and journals have different material processes that are central to their publishing ethos, and I don't believe one practice (use or avoidance of modern technologies) means the other is less valuable. There's a real variety of ways and communities through which writers find readers for their work. I'm actually grateful that there's not one single way to do it—I find as much meaning as small-press mail-only newsletters (The Index Press, for example!) as I do journals whose publication is exclusively online. Personally, the only strategy that slightly annoys me is baiting readers with selectively publishing some of an issue's pieces online. It probably hurts sales, actually...