Dirty Noir 3

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Do not submit here! This project is believed to be defunct. (October 2012)

About

We're a noir webzine that publishes weekly short fiction, serialised novellas and quarterly guest-edited collections. Nothing else. No poetry. No non-fiction. Just a hefty dose of the poison of our choice--crime fiction. The term "Dirty Noir" refers to a genre of writing, a style, that's an amalgamation of Dirty Realism and Noir. The term was coined by DN editor, Doc O'Donnell, when asked to describe his own writing in three words or less. Dirty noir, unlike straight crime fiction, is the kind of writing that's not quite literary but not quite genre either. It teeters between the two by being both character- and plot-driven. It's intelligent, well-written and multi-layered, but, also, fast-paced and full of the sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll that we all love dearly. At times, there's a little more of one than there is of the other, but the two constants are always present: The Darkness and The Dirtiness. It's a cocktail. And the kind you can't help but drink until you're too pissed to stand.

Country of Publication

Australia

Audience

Unknown

Publication Medium & Frequency

Electronic Publication Electronic PublicationPublished 52 x per year.

Fiction Believed Defunct

We want tight and concise noir fiction. The kind that grabs the reader by the balls while going down on them and leaves them thinking about it long after the job's done. Ideally, we're after Dirty Noir (the sleazy and sexy blend of Noir and Dirty Realism). The kind of fiction that teeters between genre and lit. It can lean a little more to either side, but, keep in mind, this is a crime magazine so ALL stories should have a criminal streak to them. All types of noir are welcome: Classic, Neo, Sci-fiction, Western, Urban Fantasy and so on. We're less interested in Hardboiled Detective and Copper stories, but that's not to say we won't publish them. We've just got a big ol' soft spot for the bad guys and the victims. The flawed characters: the outcasts and creeps and losers and weirdos. The everyday guys and girls that have hit rock bottom, that have nothing left to lose. The characters that have been pushed to their limits. The broken ones. We want to see desperate people doing desperate things. But above all: Make it dark, make it dirty.

Genres:
GenreSubgenres
Mystery/Crime Mystery/CrimeSubgenre: Noir.
Suspense/Thriller Suspense/ThrillerSubgenre: Noir.
Styles:
Open to all/most Styles, including: Dark, Minimalist, Realist.
Topics:
Unknown
Types/Lengths:
TypeLength Details
Flash Fiction Flash FictionUp to 1,000 words.
Short Story Short Story1,000 - 1,500 words.
Novelette Novelette10,000 - 15,000 words.
Novella Novella15,000 - 30,000 words.
Payscale:
We list broad pay categories rather than payment specifics. Check with the publisher for details.
No monetary payment No monetary payment.
Submissions:
ElectronicPostalReprintsSimultaneousMedia
OK No No OKText format submissions
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Dirty Noir Submission Statistics

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Dates

Last Updated: 17 Oct 2012
Date Added: 01 Jun 2011

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