Shenandoah 559

See other projects related to this listing

About

Shenandoah was founded in 1950 by a group of Washington and Lee University faculty members and undergraduates, Tom Wolfe among them. For a brief time it was primarily an undergraduate magazine, but under the leadership of student editor Tom Carter, Shenandoah became a quarterly, publishing a cast of international writers including e e cummings, Dylan Thomas, W. H. Auden, James Merrill, Ezra Pound, William Faulkner, and Flannery O’Connor. From the 1960s to the 1980s, Washington and Lee faculty member James Boatwright expanded the journal and published occasional theme issues, including a thirty-fifth anniversary anthology. After Boatwright’s death in 1988, Dabney Stuart took over as editor. In 1995, R. T. Smith was selected as the magazine’s first full-time editor. In 2011, Shenandoah moved online, and is now a web magazine. In August 2018, after the retirement of R. T. Smith, Beth Staples took over as editor. Shenandoah is now part of W&L’s English Department and, under Beth’s direction, is supported by a class of undergraduate interns studying editing and publishing. The editors of Shenandoah believe that reading through the perspective of another person, persona, or character is one of the ways we practice empathy, expand our understanding of the world, and experience new levels of awareness. Shenandoah aims to to showcase a wide variety of voices and perspectives in terms of gender identity, race, ethnicity, class, age, ability, nationality, regionality, sexuality, and educational background. We’re excited to consider short stories, essays, excerpts of novels in progress, poems, comics, and translations of all the above.

Country of Publication & Year Established

United States Established in 1950

Audience

Open to a broad Audience.

Publication Medium & Frequency

Electronic Publication Electronic PublicationPublished 2 x per year.

Fiction Temp Closed

Dates:
Will be open to submissions from 15 August 2019 (30.3 days from now) through 15 September 2019. 18
Genres:
General General
Styles:
Open to all/most Styles, including: Experimental, Literary.
Topics:
Open to all/most Topics.
Types/Lengths:
TypeLength Details
Flash Fiction Flash FictionUp to 1,000 words; Up to 4 pieces.
Short Story Short Story1,000 - 7,500 words.
Novelette Novelette7,500 - 8,000 words.
Payscale:
We list broad pay categories rather than payment specifics. Check with the publisher for details.
Semi-pro payment (1-4.9 US cents per word) to Professional payment (5 or more US cents per word) Pay ranges from Semi-pro payment (1-4.9 US cents per word) to Professional payment (5 or more US cents per word).
Submissions:
ElectronicPostalReprintsSimultaneousMedia
OK No No OKText format submissions
Always check guidelines for details and restrictions. If you aren't familiar with these terms, see our glossary.

Nonfiction Temp Closed

Dates:
Will be open to submissions from 15 August 2019 (30.3 days from now) through 15 September 2019. 1
Styles:
Open to all/most Styles, including: Experimental, Literary, Personal.
Topics:
Open to all/most Topics, including: Memoir.
Types/Lengths:
TypeLength Details
Essay EssayUp to 8,000 words.
Narrative Nonfiction Narrative NonfictionUp to 8,000 words.
Payscale:
We list broad pay categories rather than payment specifics. Check with the publisher for details.
Semi-pro payment (1-4.9 US cents per word) to Professional payment (5 or more US cents per word) Pay ranges from Semi-pro payment (1-4.9 US cents per word) to Professional payment (5 or more US cents per word).
Submissions:
ElectronicPostalReprintsSimultaneousMedia
OK No No OKText format submissions
Always check guidelines for details and restrictions. If you aren't familiar with these terms, see our glossary.

Poetry Temp Closed

Dates:
Will be open to submissions from 15 November 2019 (122.3 days from now) through 15 December 2019. 14
Genres:
General General
Poetry Forms:
Open to all/most Forms.
Styles:
Open to all/most Styles, including: Experimental, Literary.
Topics:
Open to all/most Topics.
Types/Lengths:
TypeLength Details
Poem PoemNo line limits known; 3 - 5 pieces.
Payscale:
We list broad pay categories rather than payment specifics. Check with the publisher for details.
Semi-pro payment (US$5-49 per poem) to Professional payment (US$50 or more per poem) Pay ranges from Semi-pro payment (US$5-49 per poem) to Professional payment (US$50 or more per poem).
Submissions:
ElectronicPostalReprintsSimultaneousMedia
OK No No OKText format submissions
Always check guidelines for details and restrictions. If you aren't familiar with these terms, see our glossary.

Visual Art Open

Art Media:
Cartoon/Comic strip.
Art Styles:
Open to all/most Art Styles.
Topics:
Open to all/most Topics.
Types/Lengths:
TypeLength Details
Graphic Narrative Graphic NarrativeNo page limits known.
Payscale:
We list broad pay categories rather than payment specifics. Check with the publisher for details.
Professional payment (US$50 or more per piece) Professional payment (US$50 or more per piece).
Submissions:
ElectronicPostalReprintsSimultaneousMedia
OK No No OKImage format submissions
Always check guidelines for details and restrictions. If you aren't familiar with these terms, see our glossary.

Shenandoah Submission Statistics

More Information is Available to Members: Only the basic information for this listing is currently visible. If you want to learn more about this listing, including submission statistics (average response time, rejection percentage, acceptance percentage, etc.), you need to subscribe. See a sample of what you're missing.

Dates

Last Updated: 16 May 2019
Last Checked: 11 Jul 2019 We check each active listing's guidelines page for changes once a month (if compliant).
Last Audited: 16 May 2019 We audit each active listing twice a year.
Date Added: 13 Nov 2005

Before Submitting

We cannot guarantee that the information on this page is correct. It is not unusual for publications to evolve or close without notice. We do our best to keep up, but it isn't always possible. Just remember…

  • Always read the full guidelines provided by the publisher.
  • Try to read at least one previous publication to get a better idea of what the editor would like to see.
  • Unless the publisher's guidelines state otherwise, always use industry standard manuscript formatting.
  • Be professional, patient, and persistent.