Editor Interviews

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Read all the editors' answers to Duotrope's interview question: What other current publications (or publishers) do you admire most? Learn more.

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Here is a small sampling from our recent Editor Interviews. We have interviewed over 1,775 editors.

Q: What other current publications (or publishers) do you admire most?

A: Jacket magazine.
Cambridge Literary review.
Cortland review.
Tears in the Fence.
Molly Bloom.
3:AM Magazine
How2
Kafeeklatsch
Almost Island
Kenyon Review
Beloit Poetry Journal
Leafe Press
Blackbird
Likestarling
Big Bridge
Litmus
Body
Long Poem Magazine
Bombay Gin
The Manchester Review
Chain
No Tell Motel
Chicago Review
Coconut
Oystercatcher Press
Paratext
Critical Documents Plume
Datableedzine
PN Review
Dusie
Poetry London
Eborakon Poetry Magazine
Prac Crit
Epizootics!
Sentence
eoagh
Shearsman
Exquisite Corpse
Ubuweb
Fascicle
The Volta
Fortnightly Review
Visual Verse
Glasgow Review of Books
The White Review
Golden Handcuffs Review
Great Works
The Wolf
Free Verse
Fulcrum
Stride
Sidebrow
Ron Silliman’s Blog

A: Analog Submission Press, 48th Street Press, Holy & Intoxicated Publications, Paper and Ink Literary Zine, and Pyre Publishing are just a few of the small presses specializing in chapbooks featuring underdog poetry.

A: As a science-fiction fan all my life, I think I gravitate naturally to publications like Clarksworld, Analog, Isaac Asimov. Outside the magazine world Tor. The work they publish is original, wonderful, captivating, imaginative...

A: We love Five Dials, Hotel, The Forge Literary Magazine, Spelk, Electric Literature, The Stinging Fly & everyone else. We're fans of small presses including Boiler House Press, Strangers Press, Peepal Tree Press, Dostoevsky Wannabe, Jacaranda Books, Prototype Publications, Influx Press, Bluemoose, &Other Stories, and oh so many more.

A: Ploughshares, Electric Literature, The New Yorker, A Public Space, Perfumer & Flavorist, New York Review of Books, The Believer, Catapult

A: Tinderbox, Rust + Moth, YesYes, Diode, Glass, the museum of americana, THRUSH, the minnesota review, Nimrod, The Adroit Journal, Alice James, Porkbelly

A: Slightly Foxed, Modern Poetry in Translation, London Review of Books, Poetry, Stepa Magazine.

A: We have a deep admiration for organizations that understand the importance of lifting up and supporting regional voices. Local literary magazines like Moss and Tahoma Literary Review, independent papers like The Stranger, and groups like Jack Straw, Artist Trust, and Hugo House.

A: Invisible Publishing is one of the big ones that my editing partner and I both really admire. I don't think we've actually read a book they've published that we haven't at least remotely enjoyed. You can tell that everything about their process is so important to them. Whether it is finding the right voices and stories, or it's the covers and internals that their designer Megan pours her heart into. It's no secret that I truly admire this publisher and based a lot of the foundations of Prime Press around the example that they set
A publisher that I've recently had on my radar is Vivek Shraya's imprint VS Books. I read Shut Up You're Pretty by Téa Mutonji and it blew me away. I think I'll be keeping an eye on this imprint for sure.

A: Honestly, nobody does what we do. We are a genre (that doesn't exist) unto ourselves. "Short stories that ask ethical questions." This is great in that we have a very unique niche, but can sometimes be a struggle because we get so many submissions that are great, but simply aren't the type of thing we publish. We tell people over and over again, we want, "The Trolley Problem" in short story form.

A: Zyzzyva, Finishing Line Press, City Lights

A: Brevity